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Elizabeth Lynch

Born: August 31, 2012
Diagnosed: April 19, 2016
Died: March 4, 2017

– Affectionate – Determined – Joyful – Exuberant –

Mom, Daria, recalls this moment that speaks to who Elizabeth was: “It was not when Elizabeth was well or when she was sick. It was when she was dying. On a mild March afternoon, as she laid on the couch, her eight year old brother leaned in and told her a joke. And Elizabeth, paralyzed from the shoulders down and unable to swallow, began to laugh, her whole body shaking with mirth and her face filled with joy as she looked up at her big brother and sister. The sound of her laughter filled the living room and still permeates it to this day. She soon lost consciousness and passed three hours later. Those who love Elizabeth find it fitting that as she stood on Heaven’s doorstep, her last voluntary act was to laugh. This memory illustrates our experience of her. Elizabeth was and is joy, laughter and transcendent exuberance.”

Mom (Daria), Dad (Tom), brother, Nathaniel, and sister, Gemma, want others to know Elizabeth’s story because: “When Elizabeth was diagnosed, my son was ten days post op from his second surgery in three weeks. He is a regular patient at Mott for some congenital, disabling health conditions. Elizabeth and her sister would often tag along to his appointments. Elizabeth was a powerhouse and was rarely sick up until about three months prior to her diagnosis. Elizabeth’s story shows the complete and devastating randomness of DIPG. If it can happen to her – if it can happen to a family with another struggling child – it can happen to any child and any family. Elizabeth was (is) our joy. The void her absence has left is indescribable. And she is one child. Magnify our agony by thousands and you can see how vital the work is of the researchers who study DIPG and the fantastic doctors and nurses who treat ‘our’ kids.”